Bookmarks

I use Firefox as my web browser. I’ve been using it for years. During that time I have accumulated a huge amount of bookmarks. In being able to migrate my Firefox profile by copying it between machines and between installs my bookmarks have migrated too.
Some I can’t remember why I even bookmarked them in the first place.

I took the step over the past few days of exporting all my bookmarks and deleting all the ones stored in my browser. I now have a new starting point for which to accumulate some more.

My bad idea has been to start trying to organise my old bookmarks into some sort of list. What struck me is what utter rubbish is stored along with the original bookmark. The useful bit is the URL, in most cases this is accompanied by the title to the article or the site I wanted to bookmark. The less useful entries have information about the author looking for job opportunities, great long strings of text about other subject matter the site covered or generally unhelpful titles that don’t actually tell you what you bookmarked.

I should have taken the time to edit the bookmark entries at the time of saving them. It is never something I want to do at the time as it breaks my train of thought. It a habit that I am unlikely to change.

Trying to sort the bookmarks by subject area I notice that quite a few span multiple areas. Looking through the bookmarks I find that I have often researched topics. I’m thinking that in future it would be easier to gather stored bookmarks around these topics. In this way I can dispense with certain collections of bookmarks once I no longer have need of the topic.

I am regretting starting this process as progress has been slow. I am working through the list, checking that the links still work, seeing if they are still relevant, renaming and finally storing under a suitable category. Once completed I should be left with a nice list of topics that I can easily refer back to.

So far I am not missing the historical bookmarks in the browser.

SSD Research

I had a spot of luck this week when I purchased an early Black Friday deal on Thursday evening. I wasn't intending to buy anything but I knew when the deals were starting and decided to have a look. I am currently awaiting delivery of an Intel 730 Series 480GB SSD. I had seen this earlier in the year (around March) and it looked a nice drive but too expensive. A 50% price reduction can change my mind.

SSD's are fragile little things, they only have a limited number of write cycles and need to be looked after. I am planning on using the drive in my main Fedora Linux desktop (which is good as this particular drive runs too hot for a laptop). I decided to research the usage of SSD's as I want it to be reliable and I want to get the most out of it in terms of performance. What I hadn't factored in was the amount of decisions that can be made.

Log files are small amounts of data that are frequently written to HDD/SSD. On my re-purposed chromebook I have disabled most of the logging as it isn't a critical system for me. I want logs for my desktop, so as I plan on having both an SSD and a HDD in the same system I can move the logs to the HDD. This was something I was expecting and reading up on. It was then I uncovered some notes about Firefox cache. Firefox (and other browsers) cache small files to disk in much the same fashion as log files. This opened up a whole new branch of ideas. Do I put the cache in RAM and lose in on reboots? Do I sync the RAM to disc with a script? Do I move the entire browser profile to RAM and sync that? Where is the cache in the first place? It appears that you can just as easily move that cache to a HDD as to RAM and it really depends on where your user profile is in the first place.

As I sit here writing this I probably know more about SSD's than I ever wanted to know. What I am finding is that I still need to know more. Some choices I have partially made, others not. I have a little more time until the drive arrives to make my mind up. I think I might wait until after Fedora 21 is released and do a clean install. Until then, more research.

Azureus Magnet Links for Linux

On a Windows machine with Firefox and Azureus installed magnet links in web pages are already associated with Azureus. In Linux (at least in my experience with Gentoo) this association is missing by default.

The following steps will enable the desired functionality.

In Firefox
Type about:config into the address bar and press Enter.

Right-click -> New -> Boolean -> Name: network.protocol-handler.external.magnet -> Value -> true

Right-click -> New -> String -> Name: network.protocol-handler.app.foo -> Value -> /usr/bin/azureus

Ensure network.protocol-handler.expose-all is set to true

This information was taken from mozillaZine.org